A Deep Dive into the World of B2B Content Production: Brad Smith

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As more B2B brands embrace content marketing as the way to engage, educate, and connect with prospects and customers, it's becoming increasingly difficult to break through and stand out.

In this episode of Marketing Spark, Brad Smith, CEO with Wordable, offers in-depth insight into:

  • How companies should approach content marketing
  • The importance of focusing on keywords that can be ranked for in the short term.
  • How to build a content marketing team and how to assess its performance
  • How to never run out of content ideas
  • How to effectively distribution content once it's been published.

Forty five minutes, or whatever theexactly like all right US five minutes in the AREOLA. Here we go in in three to one: it's Mark Evins andyou're. Listening to marketing spar according to the popular adage content that may or not or may not be true. Many PDBS companies haveenthusiastically embraced content. In the past eighteen months, content marketing took on moreimportance when conferences disappear and many companies scramble to not onlycreate content. A great content that engaged educated, encouraged and madean impact as the C of wardell. Brad Smith has a front row seat in the worldof content marketing, and it should be noted that his front row seat islocated in Hawaii, which is a pretty sweet place. Sorry, and it should benoted that his front row seat is located in Hawaii, which is a prettysweet place to operate. Welcome to market es park bred bed, your mark looka vardoes. Let's start by talking about thecontent marketing landscape over the past eighteen months. As a contentcreator, it has been fascinating to see how many brands have jumped on thecontent bandwagon some of them successfully, and some of them appearto be going through the motions and creating content for the sake ofcontent. What's your take on how the landscape has evolved since ovidemerged in March of two thousand and twenty yeah? Definitely it's. I woulddefinitely agree with your point and, if anything, it almost like things gotaccelerated. The trends underlying trends were already there. I think theyjust were sped up and made even more intense. So you see things like hugepublishers, for instance, doing affiliate content, so you see bigwebsites getting better and, and what that does is it kind of raises the Bar?And so not only do you have like more competition for like your directcompetition, then everyone thinks about you, have more competition indirectly,so you're now ranking against Amazon or Forbes or whatever. Even if you havenothing to do, you know business wise with those people you're competing in asense of search engine. You know ranking the actual results of the page.Other issues too, like you've, Google, actively taking spots away through a few different ways, so onethey're doing more, you know paid listing on a search of the result pageto their doing instant answers. So what they're doing essentially is likescraping your content, if you er, if you search for like how to make an oldfashion, you're going to see a recipe show up, and it's going to be scrapedfrom some website, that's already ranking someone's going to get theiranswer, they're going to get their recipe and they don't have to actuallyclick into the page to read whatever it is. That's on that site, and so youknow, if that, if that person's monetizing their ads or something elsethan ten they're in trouble, you have all these kind of like issues that areall coming to a head and what we're...

...seeing is a greater divergence between like the thehaves and the have nots for lack of better expression like the the amountof focus and attention going to like the first few positions on a page when you're tryingto rank something is, is becoming much greater. You might see a more skewedlandscape, whereas anything else, that's not good enough or is just kindof mediocre or average to your point. It's almost just getting it's justgetting pumped out into the black hole that that isn't getting seen or clickedor shared or linked to or whatever. So it sounds like content marketing hasbecome a more challenging landscape and I'm curious about what has surprisedyou. You know what separated companies that have thrived amid fiercecompetition for eye balls. What are they doing and you have any examples ofbrands that are doing content marketing? Well, that's a really good question. I definitely a few examples ofcompanies doing it. Well, I think one thing that has surprised me is how much big websites are still able to leveragetheir brand and their domain authority torank for things and categories that it might not have that much to do with,and so you see this a lot again in going back to like a publishing exampleor affiliate spaces. Just as a point of comparison where you might have huge websites like a forbes or someoneelse, ranking for something like you know, invoicing software reviews orsomething just completely kind of random that you would you wouldn'tthink what eveything to do with that and there they're starting to rankreally well with relatively average content. So that's kind of like the badnews. I think in a way where it's kind of like a trend that I don't love tosee because again I I don't want to see poor content be rewarded that greatly. But but the good news is you do have alot of, like you know, smaller smaller, in a senseof of where they're starting but smallerstaff companies being able to do content really well and go deeper. So TF, if that example, if the, for example, is they're going like broad shallow, Ithink what you're saying today is a lot of really good companies being able togo really really deep in their you know, categories or in their spaces and stilldo really well. Now, I'm not sure if this is a fairquestion, but what do you see as the keys to breaking through when everyoneis pumping out content is at quality content and I put quality in quotationmarks, because it's a very subjective kind of thing? Is it so does it depend on having theright strategic plan? It isn't isn't a matter of luck. I mean what are some ofthe variables that that you see as critical when you're trying to youmerge. I made a content, sunam yeah.Definitely, I think it's I like t think of it as a balance score card, so youhave the brand and the website strengthoverall, that and you have like the strategy and the strategic kind of just strategic vowin behind it of like,where you're going and why you have the...

...content itself so how it's written,whether or not their subject matter is experts included in that or not again, you cantell pretty quickly if something is kind of generical water down or if it'sreally interesting a nuance and kind of balanced and complex, then you havejust beanlet writing itself. You have things like you know, multimedia, soimages podcast video. How is that being included in that? Don't you have theactual, inerit so stuff, so everything from Topical Authority to the actualKer to researching to the link building like building a PR and distribution? SoI think, if you think about it, the good news is, if you think about allthis stuff like how marketing and advertising and promotion used to beback in the S it's pretty similar. So, like I just give you an example:distribution. What we're doing today isn't that different, it's just kind oflike a new medium. I think the important point is figuring out how youget all the things to light up. So if we're talking about how you distributecontent, are you working? Are Fr teams working together with content teams? Doyou have advertising teams working with content teams like those disconnectsare often where things fall, the better you can like align all those things,typically, the greater success we see with, like less of the larger companiesor with yeah. I think it's interesting that coordination and having astrategic plan is so important, because many companies look at content assimply creating content, and then they forget about seo distributionidentifying and connecting with influencers. So there's so manyvariables that go into content marketing success that a lot ofcompanies just don't take into account. I guess when I'm curious about who's,doing content. Well, I mean really well. Is there content that you want to readbecame it's because it's interesting, your compelling and you can. You canrecommend or suggest one of your clients as an example of a company thatreally is standing up from the crowd. Yeah. That's a good question. I wasgoing to say a load of question for sure, because I can just sit here andmention all of our work, so we work it Mondo. I think they'redoing an amazing job. I think one of the challenges they face is they their tool could work for almostany category any like B TB category, so we might be doing content on projectmanagement, but we might also be doing pro may also be doing content on agilesoftware development. We might also be doing something completely different. Isay I think, that's extremely challenging and it means you're doingnot just quality content but high quantity to, and that brings up a wholehost of other issues like well. How do you get super high quantity withoutletting the quality bar drop and that's through a bunch of other? You knowintense things like operations and processes and roll specialization, so Ikind of just brings up a whole slew of other issues where a lot of companiesthat do content well today, especially smaller ones. They have like a goodwriter or a couple good writers and they're heavily reliant on individualsand talents, which is a good thing, but I think for some of the largercompanies or like the hyper growth...

...companies. What you see is there morealliant on like the machine and building out the machine and thefactory and the assembly line of the sel person works with the strategyperson who hands it off to the writer who hands it off to the editor whohands it off to the optimizer van the producer and there's like this- is this:This very detailed assembly line very kind of like old school manufacturingmentality of operation that I think, is reallyimportant in today's environment and not enough marketers and marketingteams are strong in that area. That makes sense. So if you look at what Moneca is doing-and I see their ads all the time, so it's hard to escape them yeah- arethere two or three things that they eenre? That has helped their contentmarketing thrive. Yeah. Definitely, I think again it goes back to from the very beginning a very strongfocus on like who is their customer and why so like who? What segments convertthe best? Who has the highest lifetime value as a segent and figuring and thenbacking that into what like Ke categories, for example,should we even be publishing in at the very beginning because they could bepublishing on everything in anything like how do we actually focus andnarrow it down from there? It's then figuring out, okay. Well, how do weactually target keywords and faces that we can win, and so this is something Ilike to like harp on, but again it's kind of an old cliche, but, likemeasure twice cut once in today's like competitive kind of surp environment,the outside results- let's say: If you look at Click through rates on a searchage, a result page, let's say sixty. Seventy eighty percent go to like thetop three or four results right. It's not good enough to like the top out at position. Eight on asurf you might as well like not even sounds good because you're on the firstpage, but you're, probably getting like a sliver of any traffic, whereas if youcan get up until like the top five top four top three, it becomes heavilyskewed where you're getting all the sudden fifty sixty seventy percent ofthe action. So, if you're applying that to like a much broader content strategy where you arepublishing in a high quantity, it's super super important that you'remaking sure that you're publishing not just like the biggest keywords inyour space or the ones with the most commercial intent. Yes, those thingsare important, but they might take years to actually to rank for so sowhat are we targeting and why meaning like? Let's actually create contentthat we know we can win and that we know we can rank for within the nextsix months, because that's going to give us the biggest boost to then kindof stair step our way up up to that other competitive stuff. You know, Ilove that piece of advice, because I've been working with a lot of bb SASSclients. Looking at how to leverage content marketing in and you're right Imean you want to win in particular key words or phrases, because there's somuch competition out there that it's going to take you forever to rank forthe talk key words and that's just not a strategy. That's going to produce ourY in the short term, not totally invented added a little bit. But whatdo you see is the big mistakes that BB companies make when it comes to contentmarketing? I suspect the list could be...

...fairly extensive. Definitely so that'sone that we just touched on is competing for the wrong things thewrong times, so, knowing that it's kind of a chicken and egg problem as anexample were o bulls, really small, we just we just acquired it. About yearago traffic was trending down. I think we're at like five thousand monthlyvisits when we acquired it so super small one of the first problems that wewere facing is okay. Well, we can't go after the biggest keywords in our spaceright now long long term we can, but it might take. You know, two or threeyears realistically to ring for that stuff. So, in the short term, we to dosomething else and we need to pick a take, a different approach and go afterkeywords we can ring for- and I think now we're up to like thirty forty sanda month in terms of monthly traffic- and it was just this whole star, step,Approche, okay, we're going to go after this, this less competitive stuff.First, because we know we can win there and we're going to rank well for it andonce our website's bigger on some, we have more links once we have morecontent whence we have more topal authority, there is, we can come backand rank for that competitive stuff, the other big one we checked it onalready to which is operations, so I think marketers andmarketers are marketers. Don't have an issue with creativity. That's allthat's why we all do this. That's why we're all like in this in this field,they have an issue with processes and all the boring stuff, all theoperations, all the role specialization, all the. How do you coordinate hand,offs F, with a writer in one time zone to an editor and another time zone,especially in today's environment, where everything's a syncretist likehow do you iron out all those little kinks? Because that's that's where theball gets dropped like one person, you might have a writer who's really goodor you, man have a marketers really good. They have to hand it off tosomeone three four time zones away, if not more, and then that person has tohand it off to somebody else. How are you actually doing that to make surethis person's waking up and is ready to go and has everything they need and hastheir you know their stuff completed by the person before them without those those two people havingto jump on zoom every five minutes? I think that's the that's the challengefrom a like blocking and tackling standpoint that a lot of companies arefacing today, because they are trying to ramp up content and do all thisstuff in the absence of conventions and conferences and other things, but yet we're all forced to again bemore reliant on a syncro communication. So we've talked about the importance ofcontent and how to approach it. I want to explore a few other areas, includingbuilding it Bob Content, team, generating ideas and distribution. Howshould B DB companies approach content production on one hand they could usefreelancers agencies or contractors, but if they want people who drink theproverbial coulait, many companies want in house writers. So where should betob? Companies start when it comes to creating content for sure yeah. I thinkit's important to realize that they all have their own like strength andweaknesses. So there's no like right or wrong an answer. Necessarily, as youmentioned, with drinking the cool aid, internal people are usually best forall the intangibles, so they understand the unique point of view theyunderstand the differentiation and positioning of product versus otherones in the space they understand all that stuff intimately. Their problem isusuually output in production, so...

...internal people usually get caught upwith meetings and slack and whatever proof reading someone else'spresentation like they get pulled in all these different directions. That you're not able to publish a ton ofstuff on the back of a lot of in house writers unless you're spending a ton ofmoney on it, because I can get same thing expensive as you could imagine.So. The the challenge is always well freelancers, offer you that flexibility,you can wrap them up and down. If you want to do a big content, push forthree six months and then switch gears down the road, it's easy to kind oflike build that team out. Let it run for a little bit and then rap them downover time. You don't have to deal with the same. You know internal HR,headaches and other things to like rant people up and down the problem withfreelancers is is usually getting everyone on the same page and makingsure you have consistency across whatever you know three, four, five,ten twenty people who are all external and have their own things and their ownlives and their own clients, and that's incredibly challenging because youspend a ton of time. That is an always a counted for on project management, onediting on things that are like the soft and Tangibles to get all thosepeople together, a inces offer a different approach of like you usuallyget skill sets you might not have internally. So, for example, whensomeone hires our agency, they get strategy people. They get so peoplethey get not just the writers and editors, but also designers, videopeople again trying to hire all those roles externally or excuse meinternally would be Super Coppeh tive and not always like realistic shes tendto be more expensive on the surface, but again, if, if you account for someof those things like dextra man power, so to speak, of management andeverything internally, it becomes expensive. So I guess the point is:Where are you at in terms of resources in terms of internal team? Already, so,do you internally have the people in place to manage a team of writers? Ifnot, then you're, probably better off, going with something like an agency?Conversely, if your, if your problem is more bottom of the funnel that top ofthe buttle meaning, if your problem is more conversions and and doing thingsthat speak the language of the customer and creating case studies and othercontent around that type of stuff, usually better with internal people,because it's easier to get them on board with that, as opposed to externalagencies which which might give or free lancers, as might give you the horsepower, that's better suited to scaling out like top of the funnel kind ofcontent of that makes sense. That's great is as great advice, and Ican tell you from personal experience that finding good freelancers is a hugechallenge and then there's a lot of work that I find that goes into editingtheir copy, because they just don't know the brand tone, the brand language,and they just don't, have the Roman expertise to really nail it. So thereare pros and cons to every single angle. But let's assume that you want to buildan in house content team. Where do you start? What's the first move to make to getthe ball rolling in the right direction, like what type of person should youhire out of the gate? Yeah? Definitely...

I try to urge roll specialization earlyjust so you kind of get in that mindset. So, in other words, don't just Hie,don't just think you're going to hire like a couple of writers and then like.Let him go, you really need someone who's like a content manager. Sometimesthese people can can do multiple things so, some times a content manager canalso edit what I, what I don't like to see is when you try to make a goodwriter a content, editor or manager, because it's right, it's almost likethe Michael Scott problem of taking a good sales person and making him amanager like their skill sets, are often don't overlap. So, in other words,a content manager is really good at building out these processes. Buildingout a style guys to make sure here is how our brand boys should look andsound and feel, and all those things like, I said t they can often edit.They could often also write, but again it doesn't always go in the samedirection where you're not always going to get a couple good writers who thenhave like their project band or hat to, because that person is also going to bedoing quid research they're also going to be doing both like the qualitative brand voice and style, but also the thequantitative of like metrics and figuring out. Okay. Now how we're goingto actually promote this thing to writers, even like you know, evenreally good writers, don't always have that skills that really good writersthrive on Ingenuity on saying the same thing, multiple different ways, and sothey they're almost like rewarded internally for for purposely doingthings differently each time and that's like the opposite of how you want likea content team to actually run what are the different ways to assessthe performance of your content team members. You know what separates thegood ones from everyone else, so you could look at the standard KPIS. Youknow time on site click through on CA's. That kind of thing I mean those are allvery data, driven, very quantitative. But how do you assess? How do youbalance quantitative and qualitative when it comes to content production,because a big part of it is creativity yep? You know thinking outside the boxsapproaching content from different angles, so that your content isengaging from where you sit. What separates the good ones for everybodyelse, yeah! Definitely it's! It is hard like you're saying, because it's it'slike a little ven Daram that you want. So you want. You want someone who is ashovin subject matter experts, especially if you're hiring them house.Otherwise again, it's probably not worth the time or the money, Dyer andhouse unless there are a subject matter expert in the space already. So that'sa critical component, because what you don't want is your content to soundhollow and generic and water down. You want there to be nuance involved. Youwant that person to be able to consider like different complex factors,especially the more like Benob or complex sales. Your product gets themore that's important because your audience is tends to be moresophisticated. Your buyers, your customers, tend to be a lot moreSPICCATO and they're going to see through that pretty quickly so subjectmatter, expertise is one, but writing and style is the other one. So is there a voice, meaning like doesthis person actually sound? Do they...

...write like they sound when they'respeaking, because when I'm talking right now, I sound very choppy and Isound especially if you look at a podcast transcription and then youthink you're just going to publish that directly. Sometimes it doesn't work asyou know, because it just it comes across as choppy you. We switch topicstoo much when we talk. You want a little bit of that in the actualwriting itself. So you don't want like super overly formulaic stuff, you don'twant super formalized wording and phrasing. Even if you have a companyculture, that's very formal. You still want something: that's relatable when,when you're reading it because again someone's trying to read information,educational content whatever, and they need to feel some emotional engagementto that, they don't feel motion emotional engagement to like awikipedia page or something that's just kind of fact. fact, driven and dry andtechnical, you know, and then the other component, like you said, is someknowledge of so and so either. If, if the writer doesn't have that already,that's where it's good to have some sort of content manager or similarWHO's able to help structure, how the content should look, and so I thinkwe're going to touch on like promotion distribution on a second. But I thinkone of the important points and touch on here is that if you don't structurecontent properly from the very beginning, you're only going to makeyour life super difficult when it comes to promote it and to try and rank itdown the line, meaning if you're writing how to make ice coffee a pieceof content how to make it to make it really really basic how to make icecoffee. If you try to get like your product page to ring for that, it'snever going to work so, in other words, the actual structure of that content.It doesn't line up with search intent from the very beginning, so you'releading the writer down a bad path. That two years from now is never goingto help you rank for that term, and that becomes an issue for the promotionaspect. You know at the very end, so that's the little Ben Diagram of likesomething better expertise, writing ability and kind of copy writing orvoice, or whatever you want to call it like some, some interesting andengaging way of actually getting the words out and then and then some sortof background or knowledge of like a solid, so foundation. That sounds likea classic infographic for creating a content, marketing team that resonant.I like that. I like the concept of illustrating what it takes to creategood content, because content is subjective, Yep and it can be no, it'squantity, then qualitative. So that's like that's a really good insight. Ispend a lot of time I linked in like a lot of people these days, I see a lotof posts about the challenges of coming up with ideas for content. I spent many years as a reporter andand I was trained to see story angles from all kinds of differentperspectives. You know I understand that content. Marketing is a beast thatneeds to be continually fed from where you sit. How do brands continually comeup with content ideas, yea, let alone content that they're going to publish?I mean what are some of the the key processes or systems that need theyneed to have in place to make sure that the machine is fed and is always fedbecause you're, if you run in a content...

...ideas, then you're getting the waterfor sure yeah. First, if you, if you do it right, you should never run out ofideas. I struggled from the opposite problem where I have too manyspreadsheets of like potential areas to go into that I'll, probably never getto. I think, first and foremost, moremarketers need to work in when I say work in I mean an air quotes, work incustomer support and the- and I learned this like the hard way early on at atravel company, where I was kind of on the front lines from a digital andsocial perspective, and I was kind of forced to deal with like customerproblems and inquiries and everything, and so I got good or you know- had toget good at talking to customer service, customer support operations andlearning more and trying to figure out like just there are so many problems and issues that people runinto without you even being aware of it, and unless you are actually readingcustomer support emails or unless you're actually reading these problemsfirst hand or you're. Reading your capter reviews and or your g to reviewsand taking the good and the bad unless you're, actually and again that caneven go to your sales team to unless you're, actually in talking tocustomers or getting that feedback from the people who are talking to customerslike sales like operations like custer sport, you're, not you're, not reallygetting the full picture, you're getting a very narrow view of who orwhat you think. Customers are. Yes, you should definitely also be doing thethings like jumping into your favorite c research tool and looking at adjacentspaces, all those like marketing tips and tactics that people love to talkabout is like Oh yeah, go to answer the Publico and type in a keyword and it'llshow you all the related questions, like those things are good, but but youshould also just be looking at like what are customers and you knowactually trying to do with your product and what's holding them back, and thereshould be no shortage of like potential topics, idea that come from that thechallenge is always. How do you make those types of topics that are verycustomer centric from a support or painpont arena link back tothe SEO? Because again, if we're going to the content at expense of or excuseme we're going to all the effort and expense of producing content and andyou're hiring subject matter, experts, the stuff goes really expensive reallyquickly. So the only way it's worth it in the long run is, if you do have thatsolid foundation of so so you know it's going to it's going to produce results,not just tomorrow when you share it on like tin or tomorrow, when you share itas a with your support team or on a Levana, but like two or three yearsfrom now to rank well too. So I think that's always the challenge in my mind,is how do you? How do you tie the two worlds, together of like all thepotential keywords and topics you can go after by doing all the classicthings of searching around okay? Well, my product is, you know whatever bestmy products as CR m product, so therefore it has these features. Thoseare basic topics from there. It's like, okay. Well, how do people find this?It's going to be they're, searching for comparisons, so best CR, m productalternatives, sales first versus hub spots, cram like what are all the akind of more classic affiliate...

...publishing and then back out it fromthere like well, do as your sales team dropping the ballbecause their email reply template suck so email reply. Template becomes thekey word and then you just keep like going broader and broader and broaderagain, how do you connect all that kind of classic heard research orientedstuff with with the stuff that your sales team is coming up with with thestuff that your customers, port teams coming up? It Yeah? I think it's a it'sa complicated and time consuming balancing act between customer in siteand reviews, and so and I think personally, that a lot of marketersdon't talk to their customers enough. They don't sit on sales, calls theydon't read the transcripts from customer success, calls or customerservice calls and they operate blind. I mean you can't solely depend on Seo foryour content ideas, because then you're just delving into the data and you'reignoring the real world and real people, so there's so many variables when itcomes to content marking and I think a lot of markets just focus on thecontent, the other war that I want to talk to you about- and this issomething that a guy named Ross Simmons advocates for all the time on Linkedinand twitter is content distribution. It's one thing to publish content, it'sanother to make sure that enough of the right people see it. In fact, I believethat one of the new and hot marketing jobs will be the head of contentdistribution. What are your thoughts about content, distribution and theapproach the BB companies need to take to make sure their content gets seenand has the impact that they want yeah? Definitely I think it's I think it'shard and getting harder to your point because of all the noise. I thinkthat's one of the challenges. Another challenges you have a lot of. You havea lot of people trying to do the same things so like. If you have you heard of the law of, shouldyou cook your rates? I think that was a concept from Andrew Shanno works atOber and a much rather like start up to bat basically is. His point was like.If you look at the click through rate of Banaras, when Baner ads first cameout, it was amazing, like it was really good, and if you look at the click, therate on banner ads today, it's awful and the point, and then you can. Youcould draw that comparison across other things where, if you remember facebookmarketing like even ten fifteen years ago, you could like gate pages. So youcould like force people to like your page to then to them like get someincentive, and then the organic reach and distribution wasso high at the time you could, you could kill it. You could do so well,just doing the like getting game of like put a coupon or whatever bahistbehind the light gate or do a contest behind the like it. You have to like toenter and then share stuff on linked in and, like you know, a huge percentageof the people who already like you, actually see your your results againcontrast that today, no one sees your results unless they're paid on link orexcuse me on facebook. You got to pretty much like pay to promoteeverything which again it's good and bad. It's just the taxis have changed alittle bit, but the point is if once...

...something starts working well andeveryone starts doing it from a distribution standpoint. It often getsa lot harder, a lot more expensive or the reach starts dropping off, and so one of the things again that I like toharp on is going back to our point earlier of don't target key words, forinstance, that you can't rank for in the short term, when you're doing thatinitial key with research and put in the content ideas together, you shouldknow how you're already going to distribute it. So if I need, if I'mlooking at a competitive keyword- and I want to rank for it in whatever sixmonths twelve months and I look at okay- it has a hundred links or the theaverage competition. Let's say- has a hundred hundred quality links to this individual pieceof content. I better know how I'm going to get those hundred plus links to thispiece of content before I ever created, because otherwise, again, I'm justgoing to set myself up for failure. So how am I going to do that? Am I goingto do? Is there going to be related to a promotion? Is it going to be relatedto a product launch? Am I going to run a contest? Can I do kind of do a big PRpush? Can I we do guest post? CAN WE DO PODCASTS? Can we do? Can we do like paid a paid campaign onLindon or facebook? Can we tied in with webinars like what are all thepotential tactics that we might already be doing or the we might already begood at and then the other thing I like to really focus on for distribution,especially for Bob Companies, is with our example of like building you seeall these blog post at say, like a hundred and one link building tacticsto whatever start this year. You don't need a hundred and one like buildingtactics. You need like two or three and you need to do them really really. Well,so don't you need to understand like what your organizations good at andstick to your strength, and you need to do it better than everyone else and eda bigger scale than everyone else. So you know as a content company we'rereally good at like a couple things and we're really good at like content inthe Bataban, I'm not going to pick up tick tock or I'm not going to jump onthe latest social band wagon, because I know that I'm not well suited to thatand our company's strengths aren't well suited to that. So don't don't getshiny, you know, tactics and drum, don't don't chase those wells becauseyou're not going to be able to do them as well or better than the people whoare going to do them. Well, you need to kind of stick to your strength becauseof these issues like sea ton of competition because of the the organicyou know reach falling off, you could still see success with those channelsand different places. You just need to be able to do it better than everyoneelse and again that goes back to maybe your own internal team, your owninternal structure and what you, what your brand is known for and good out inthis pace, two final questions, one: What does wordable do and to how didyou end up living in Hawaii yeah? Definitely so wordable I'll take theeasy ones. First word able we were customer overdale and I run anagency that does like three four hundred articles a month, so we createand publish an promote like three four in our cold month, we found that wewere spending like, on average, thirty to sixty minutes, uploading formatting,optimizing, an individual piece of...

...content. Doing that times. Three fourhundred acles a month is very costly and time consuming, especially when youconsider like woo on your team has to actually do that. Well, so what youoften see is a lot of teams, even if they do produce a lot of content. Itoften just like, sits somewhere and Google docks or you know whatever wherever they end up.Writing you have this huge lag and bottle neck between creating thecontent and editing it and getting reviewed and then actually getting itlive. Hopefully you know start ranking and producing results for you. Sowordable moves content from Google Docs to a CAS. Basically so it'll kind of doit in seconds. You can do it in bulk and then we'll also start applying alot of the opton page, optimization that companies should be doing but dont,always so compressing images opening length in a new Tam to keep readers onside being able to select the author and category and all that extra, allthe extra stuff you usually have to do when you put a piece of content into acontent. Man System again to like get it kind of published, ready, wordablewill kind of automate all that that messy stuff for you. So that's whatwordable does. Second question was why so we we've been visiting here andtraveling here for a while of my family and we've always loved it, like mostpeople, who've been here and we've always talked about trying to live hereand our trips get getting longer and longer and longer, and so finally, wedecided to come out and just to try living here. We kind of bounced arounddifferent islands for a little bit to see where we want to live and where wethought I was a good place for our family and our young kids and all thatkind of stuff. And so, as you can imagine, it's pretty great. It's remoteAmazon take super long. That's a that's a one bummer! You can't get things in aday or two. So that's kind of one downside, there's not a lot of nightlife, pretty quiet, so you got to be comfortable with these things, but Ithink once you once you know, once you find that sweet spot and kind of canget into it, then you realize it's a pretty amazing place to live, and Iguess, as you mentioned off the top as long as you're willing to get up atfive o'clock in the morning to Odasetet works as well. Yeah, definitely youcould. I don't know if you, if it's a video, but you could see like myfluorescent office lights above me, some of them are just kicking onbecause you got to like it takes them a while to warm up and yeah. It's aboutit's what five forty right! Now I am so yeah you gotta gotta, get comfortablewith making up in the middle of the night, but you can you can get downearly and when you're at by the beach at one pm two PM, it's not bad life isgood yeah. I is good well thanks for all the great insightBrad. Where can people learn more about you and wordable definitely go towordable dot. Io is the best place I'm on Linkedin at. I think my name is B smarketer, because those are my initials and also marketers are full of BS,sometimes so it's kind of funny and then and then yeah. I also run andinvolved in two agencies, a contentation agency called codeless anda link building company like building a PR company called you, sir, so we'reOboloi is usually the best place to start for all that fun stuff.

Thanks for listening to another episodeof Marketing Park, if you enjoyed the conversation, leave a review subscribeby Itunes, spotify or your favorite podcast out and share vias Ocana, learn more about how I help Btbai it apractial semo. I you advisor in coach and an email to mark and marketingspark.

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