Is Twitter & LinkedIn the One-Two for B2B Marketers?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As much as many people have seen significant ROI from LinkedIn (connections, conversations, and leads), I'm beginning to see some people explore other social media platforms.

It could be that LinkedIn is getting busier and/or that people see potential to make connections on places like Twitter, Tik Tok, and Instagram.

To get an insider's view of the landscape, I talked with Marcus Schaller, who recently shifted some of his social media time to Twitter. 

Most interesting is how Marcus is taking some of the key lessons from LinkedIn and applying them to Twitter.

Hi, it's Mark Evans and you'relistening to marketing spark. Now, usually I would say the podcast that bringsyou insight from marketers in twenty five minutes or less, but today I'm watchinga second format, Mani podcast, conversations in ten minutes or less to tacklespecific topics. If you've been using linkedin over the past year, you'll understandthe power that it offers to connect and as important to have conversations. Butnothing last forever and I'm seeing some people dabble with other social platforms, andone of them is mark a shower, a BB SASS content marketing strategist.Now, like me, Marcus is a content machine on Linkedin, but he'srecently got more active on twitter. Let's find out why. Welcome to marketingspark. Thank you, mark. I'm so excited to be here with youtoday. Yeah, you're my proverbial Guinea pig when it comes to this newformat, so we'll see how it goes.

That's fine, I love it.I love it. To start, let's talk about what you've done onLinkedin over the past year and how it's worked for you. A lot ofpeople have embraced linkedin and got a lot out of it. What is what'syour been experience been like? And just to give a little context, I'vebeen on Linkedin for many, many years before, like most people, butlike most people, was just it was just kind of a profile sitting therein an occasionally post link to my blog or whatever, and I always hadkind of a love hate relationship with social media because I felt like I wasapproaching it really from too much of a selfish point of view, self interest. I wasn't really approaching it from interested in other people. It was morejust how do I push out my own content? And when the pandemic hit, you know, obviously all of us are kind of lockdown and I'm hadit opportunity to really kind of just not just rebrand myself, but start fromscratch and ask myself moving forward. You know, at the time I wasfocused on SAS copywriting. Moving forward,...

...what would I really want to doif, if the world stopping? This is an opportunity for me to kindof reset, and that's what I did and I started focusing on problem solvingfor marketers and things like that, and so linkedin is where I started thatjourney again, if you will, and really just kind of learning it fromthe ground up, and you're actually one of the first people who I startedinteracting with on Linkedin in that period of time, as well as a peoplelike James Carberry and and people over there at sweet fish, and it reallyset the tone differently this time because people were actually engaging in a way thatI never saw on linkedin before. was just I scroll down, it wasjust people doing what I was doing pretty much was here's an awesome poster,here's a Webinar and they just put a link, which is really boring aftera while. My experience in the last year has been really built on thatfoundation of interact with real people being able to kind of just experiment from there, you know, doing sliders and having my own, you know, podcasts. You know now a different one that...

I'm doing. So it's written sucha different, positive experience this last twelve, fourteen months, despite all the coviddrama. If you're having so much success on Linkedin, explain the moveto twitter? Why split some of your precious social time on another platform?That's a great question and I think you know it's also to how do wedefine success right? It's like, what are the hard things about social media. It's so easy to get caught up with Linkedin envy or whatever, youknow, and there's there's so many people on there that have so such biggerimpact than I do. So it's all relative. But I think when Ia couple of things happened. One was I noticed that a lot of peoplewho I wanted to really engage with one on one and built start building aconnection in relationship with just we're not active on Linkedin. They were kind ofdoing the same thing I mentioned earlier. They work for a company there werein a marketing leadership role and maybe they push out some some content from thecompany, but they weren't necessarily posting our...

...commenting on it and there was noreal opportunity for me to really start a conversation right or be part of that. And so I a few weeks ago, I start experimenting a little bit withtwitter again and just to see how many of these people were on twitter, and if it turned out that none of them were, then that mighthave been the end of the experiment right, but it turned out that, youknow, enough of them were were. It made sense and of people likeyourself, who I've been for I call friend, you know, nowfor over a year because of Linkedin, we're also on twitter, so it'slike, oh, there's something here. As far as splitting my time,I kind of look at it as they're mutually supporting, because the first thingI started doing with twitter was was not just putting out text post but kindof using twitter in a way that kind of supports or kind of adds onto my visual approach with content. Like I do these kind of goofy lookingwhite boards, style stick figure things, you know, and you know withthe with Linkedin, I get to do...

...those as sliders, right, sothere's multiple panels and that's that's awesome. And with twitter, as far asI know, you can't do that, but you could do, you know, individual images. So what I've been doing is just having fun, sayingokay, well, how can I take those slide decks and split them upinto separate tweets, right, and just enjoying what twitter gives me that Linkedindoesn't, and and just kind of using each each of those to build onthe other. That makes sense. It sounds like you're approaching twitter differently thanyou might have in the path. Is that the fact that you're sharing differenttypes of content or, as you say, sharing those stick figures that you liketo create. Are there any different ways that you're using twitter than whatyou might have done previously? Yeah, I think it starts with the fundamentalissue that I mentioned earlier, which is your mindset. I've admitted in thepast many times that, you know, I used to be quite, Idon't know, selfish, to too strong...

...word, but little too self interestedwhen it came to social media. You know, I wasn't necessarily looking atit as what is interesting about these other people. was more about how kindof use it as a tool to, you know, advance my own agenda, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's just for me it made theexperience a very shallow and empty one because ultimately I'm not all that interesting,you know, compared to the rest of the world. I'd luck to thinkof that I am, but you know, I'm interesting to my family open.That was the first fundamental shift right. So when I think about how Iuse twitter differently now, twitter was always difficult for me in the pastbecause I felt like it would just take so much time and you're constantly tryingto keep up with the scroll and all that. But now I'm really enjoyingjust other people's content, other people's point of view, learning from other people, yourself included. I've learned a lot from and and really having that ismy foundation instead of it being how do I get people to just like andcomment and all that? That's all wonderful. I'd love that. I'd love ahuge audience, but that's kind of...

...out of my control. What Ican control is is how much focus do I put on the people that areon there? And then the second step is, you know, what doI do differently on twitter, or how I approach that differently, is reallynot using it as a platform for simply pushing out links to other content.I still do that to a degree and and that's fine. What I'm tryingto do now is really just have it almost as a selfcontained ecosystem where everypost I'm putting out. It's tough because it's kind of, you know,Short everyone that I'm putting out is enough where it actually starts in a conversationor offer some kind of value in and of itself. One of the questionsthat I have about twitter and people using twitter in a different way or peoplewho have been using Linkedin, is that on Linkedin, it just seems easierto connect with people, to message him, to ask for a conversation. Canyou provide some insight on how you drive connections and conversations on twitter asopposed to simply following somebody? Yeah,...

Linkedin seems to be I don't know, the tools seem to be more intuitive. Connections can be taken to the nextlevel a lot easier. But on twitter, I mean, maybe I'musing it wrong, but it seems like the easiest thing to do is justfollow somebody. But I guess what I'm not doing is reaching out to peopleas well to ask for a conversation. Is that the trick for twitter?That's another great question and I don't know if I have the the right answerfor that. From my perspective, though, is at this point I'm looking atit as there's kind of a bridge between either whether it's Linkedin or twitterand what we're doing right now or, you know, being able to reachout to mark Evans with an email and say hey, you know, Ihave a question for you, or do you know this person, whatever,where there's a relationship right, and for me a big part of that hasbeen podcasting, right. So it's so, you know, like what we're doingright now. I've met more interesting people doing my podcast over the lasttwelve, fourteen months then I have honestly...

...in the last twelve to twenty yearsof my career. I kind of looked at Linkedin and twitter, as youknow. First of all, how do you find people that are interesting tobegin with? Right, and and there's plenty of them. There's more thanenough. What I do is I don't push myself to comment or like thingsthat I don't feel like I should like I really feel like doing that.Right. So I don't want to just be like a numbers game where I'mjust commented like Hey, spot on, that's great, ideas whatever. Ifit doesn't hit me, I just keep going. There's enough people that postenough interesting things were. It gives me the opportunity to kind of roll withthat and and add something of my own perspective or ask them a question andthen, based on their you know, if they respond to me and nowthere's a little bit of a conversation and and from there I might look atthat individual and go, Oh, you know, this person's really great atcontent marketing or this person really understands this specific category I want to talk tothem about coming on to my show and or I have a question for themor whatever it is, you know.

So it's always kind of like takingit, quote unquote, offline, even though obviously most of the stuff isstill Internet based. But how do I take the conversation off right twitter,off of linkedin right and then and then build on that? However it isand one of the things that's been amazing for me with linkedin particularly and hopefullytwitter, is it the serendipity of it. I've had just clients come the brandnew clients that I literally had on my crm that I was going toreach out to that day in some cases actually reach out to me because theysaw I I saw them on linkedin right. So you just never or you knowyou I looked at their profile on Linkedin or whatever it is right thereis that kind of rolling the dice thing and I'm just curious and interest tosee how that pans out with twitter over the next few months. Final question. Where can people connect with you on Linkedin and twitter? Well, thebest place is actually just the Marcus shallercom...

...website because I have the links there. But I'll give all of them the reason I say that it's my nameis a little hard to spell phonetically, so it's just a marcus SCCH alller. And thencom for the website. Linkedin is the same thing, justfor its lash, Marcus shaller. And then twitter, at it's different.Marcus a Shaller, a as an apple. Middle Name is not apple, butit's a that's how you can find me. Well, thanks, Marcus, for being the, I guess, the first experiment in for the newformat. Thank you so much. I'm glad I got to be the Guineapig. Hopefully the experiment was a success. Thanks for listening to another episode ofmarket he spark. Let me know what you think about the new formatand, if you enjoyed the conversation, leave review and subscribe by Itunes,spotify or your favorite podcast out. If you'd like to learn more about howI helped Beb SASS companies as a fractional CMO, strategic advisor and coach,send an email to mark at Mark Evanscom.

I'll talk to you next time.

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